“We remain willing and ready to work across the aisle, and with our Senate partners, to reauthorize VAWA. Unfortunately, my understanding is the Democrat majority intends to reintroduce their VAWA reauthorization from last Congress. This radical legislation stands no chance of becoming law and is merely evidence of the majority’s regrettable intent to weaponize this important legislation to score political points. That is fundamentally unfair to the women who depend on the services these programs provide.”

WASHINGTON — Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.), Ranking Member of the House Judiciary Committee, made the following statement at today’s Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) hearing.

Below are the remarks as prepared.

Ranking Member Doug Collins: Madam Chairwoman, thank you for holding this hearing today. I share your belief that the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act is critical, and I appreciate the opportunity to hear from our witnesses.

The Violence Against Women Act was first signed into law in 1994, when domestic violence was largely considered a “hidden crime.” The law signaled awareness of the need to stop the growing tide of domestic violence and sexual assault.

While this law has helped us take great strides in the right direction, sadly, domestic violence and sexual assault are still far too prevalent today. These crimes continue to disproportionately impact women.

That’s why we need to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act and make sure it’s working and focusing on those it was intended to help.

House Republicans tried to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act through the end of this fiscal year, but Democrats blocked that reauthorization. We wanted to ensure this program remained up and running while discussions continued about ways to improve current law.

We remain willing and ready to work across the aisle, and with our Senate partners, to reauthorize VAWA. Unfortunately, my understanding is the Democrat majority intends to reintroduce their VAWA reauthorization from last Congress. This radical legislation stands no chance of becoming law and is merely evidence of the majority’s regrettable intent to weaponize this important legislation to score political points. That is fundamentally unfair to the women who depend on the services these programs provide.

I look forward to hearing from our witnesses today and working to reauthorize VAWA in a way that reduces violence, protects victims, and ensures the law works as intended.